At the same time, traditional courtship and marriage rituals were evaporating.

More than ever before, networks needed to produce entertaining shows that attracted audiences.

It was during this period that dating shows started to transform, depicting live, on-air matchmaking and dates between single males females.

These new shows were ways for singles to get to know each other in a fun, flirty environment.

And for those who had little dating experience, it was a model for courtship; soon, the viewing public was able to reconceptualize ideas of love, relationships and marriage.

For example, Human Satellite TV’s “Red Rose Date” featured 12 single males and females who interacted with one another by performing, playing games, and having roundtable chats.

Audiences could also tune into shows imported from overseas, such as “Love Game,” a popular Taiwanese show that matched singles through three rounds of speed dating.

By 2000, that number had skyrocketed to 32.6 percent.

Meanwhile, divorces in China rose from 170,449 couples in 1978 to 3.5 million in 2013, while marriages with foreigners increased from less than 8,500 couples in 1979 to over 49,000 couples in 2010.

Others partnered with corporations to boost advertising revenues.