Built in typical 18th century Dutch architectural style, the building is noted not only for its colorful façade but for its contents, too.

Among them are a bell cast in 1698; tombstones, written in Portuguese that are incorporated into the church floor, and a brass Bible stand. Kinabatangan River is the second longest river in Malaysia, stretching nearly 550 km (350 miles) from the mountains to Sulu Sea.

Redang Island is made for beach lovers, with its white sand beaches and crystal clear ocean water, making it popular with snorkelers – great snorkeling is the island’s main attraction. Though it’s one of the largest islands off the eastern Malay Peninsula, it’s small enough that visitors can get around on foot, either on roads or trekking through the jungle.

Redang Island is one of nine islands in a marine nature reserve. Bako National Park is a popular tourist attraction in Malaysia for travelers who enjoy the great outdoors.

Almost 2 million foreign tourists traveled to Malaysia in 2010.

Most of them were citizens from neighboring countries such as Singapore and Indonesia but a growing number of other foreign tourists are discovering this country as well.

The top Malaysia tourist attractions: Wannabe botanists likely will enjoy a visit to Gunung Gading National Park where the world’s largest flower grows.

Rafflesia blooms can grow up to three feet in diameter, and have a nasty smell.

Riding this train is a good way to see local villages with houses built on stilts and rice paddies being worked with water buffalo.

Travelers enjoy Asian and Continental cuisine meals as they journey in one of five restored carriages. Travelers who like to stop ‘til they drop will have a field day at Bukit Bintang, Kuala Lumpur’s main shopping district.

Travelers can take a trip into the past with a ride on a 1900s steam train, the North Borneo Railway.