That number may even be higher now, as the study came out just as Snapchat, then an ephemeral multimedia messaging platform built around disappearing photos and video, was taking off. If you want to send a nude (and have a willing participant), then send a nude. The only way to truly control your nude distribution is to do it yourself. If you decide to send nudes, you assume the risk of those nudes ending up in a public forum, and should prepare yourself for the worst case scenario — but you can significantly lower that risk by following this guide to best practices for ~sensual~ electronic communication.

Just follow these simple steps: Take a pic of your goods, download the pic to an encrypted hard drive, drop in a password-protected folder, confiscate your partner’s phone, show them the image, close the file, return their phone, and proceed. These tips don’t offer a complete guarantee that your nudes won’t be leaked, but they are a good First Line of Defense Against the Dark Interwebs.

If you've ever sent or received a sext, you're not alone.

You’ll have to delete the chats manually from your cloud service account. Go to File New Image From Folder and select the folder you want to protect. Under Image Format options, select read/write so you can still add and delete photos at your leisure.

If you must, the best way to save your most sensitive photos is through the aforementioned method: on an encrypted hard drive in a password-protected folder. Under Encryption options, select 128-bit AES encryption and add a password. You can do it for individual files too, through the Preview app.

Do they seem like they take basic security precautions with their devices (see: tip #2)? You can use apps that employ the most secure end-to-end encryption available, but it won’t matter if the person on the other end takes a screenshot, and “accidentally” posts it to Twitter.

So make sure that the person you’re sending your Anthony Weiner to is someone who understands the value of the safekeeping of your selfie.

It has some anti-screenshot measures that make it hard to capture the screen without the assistance of another person.

You can set your photo to expire, and add different levels of security to it, like requiring the recipient to tap two circles repeatedly to view the photo for short bursts of time, line the phone up to their face, and keep the phone very still.

However, neither of these notification features prevent someone from taking the screenshot in the first place, and they could easily take advantage of the app’s biggest loophole: taking a photo of the screen with another device.

Messaging apps that employ end-to-end encryption, like Signal and Whats App, are great for protecting your various states of undress from hackers and government surveillance.

Bleep (free, i OS and Android) is an app that’s ideal for people who want their images to self-destruct after they’re received.