This focus was picked upon by barrister Roger Daniells-Smith, who in an early appearance on behalf of GS reportedly told the court: "We say this is a moral crusade by Kent Police to extend the law, to try to get this material included as extreme pornography." Kent Police reject this.

Online sex text chat without registering-4

The decision has been broadly welcomed by CEOP, the UK organisation tasked with policing the online world for child abuse: "This is a landmark case [and] a good opportunity from a law enforcement point of view.

It opens up the possibility of more people being prosecuted for offences against children." So what difference does this make?

The case has been wending its way through the legal system since April 2010, when GS was charged with nine counts of publishing an obscene article contrary to section 2(1) of the Obscene Publications Act 1959, and one count of possessing an indecent image.

What was particularly innovative was that the material in question was a series of text logs of online chats between GS and one other individual.

Throughout that period, the idea that it might be used to police one-to-one conversation does not seem to have figured highly in the thinking of police and prosecuting authorities.

Indeed, as previously reported in The Register, a submission by Kent Police to the consultation on the extreme porn law in 2005/6 complained that the law was insufficient and, as they submitted: "There remains a legislative gap in terms of written fantasy material specifically about child rape and murder".

This is legal dynamite - and in one single judgment catapults the UK to the back of the queue on a range of international indices on freedom of speech.

The change to the law - or clarification as judges might describe it - came about in February when the Appeal Court ruled on a prosecution appeal in respect of an individual identified only as "GS".

In the light of this ruling, GS, who had previously been defending against all counts, changed his plea to guilty.

Back at Maidstone Crown Court in July 2012, before Judge Philip St John-Stevens, the court accepted his plea, dropped the indecent image charge – and sentence will be delivered on 7 September.

Single payments for regional advertising of profile (one-time appearance in scrolling banner for

Indeed, as previously reported in The Register, a submission by Kent Police to the consultation on the extreme porn law in 2005/6 complained that the law was insufficient and, as they submitted: "There remains a legislative gap in terms of written fantasy material specifically about child rape and murder".This is legal dynamite - and in one single judgment catapults the UK to the back of the queue on a range of international indices on freedom of speech.The change to the law - or clarification as judges might describe it - came about in February when the Appeal Court ruled on a prosecution appeal in respect of an individual identified only as "GS".In the light of this ruling, GS, who had previously been defending against all counts, changed his plea to guilty.Back at Maidstone Crown Court in July 2012, before Judge Philip St John-Stevens, the court accepted his plea, dropped the indecent image charge – and sentence will be delivered on 7 September.Single payments for regional advertising of profile (one-time appearance in scrolling banner for $1 – user picture, link, short text for mouseover; bidding war for stationary second banner cost of $1/minute).

||

Indeed, as previously reported in The Register, a submission by Kent Police to the consultation on the extreme porn law in 2005/6 complained that the law was insufficient and, as they submitted: "There remains a legislative gap in terms of written fantasy material specifically about child rape and murder".

This is legal dynamite - and in one single judgment catapults the UK to the back of the queue on a range of international indices on freedom of speech.

The change to the law - or clarification as judges might describe it - came about in February when the Appeal Court ruled on a prosecution appeal in respect of an individual identified only as "GS".

In the light of this ruling, GS, who had previously been defending against all counts, changed his plea to guilty.

Back at Maidstone Crown Court in July 2012, before Judge Philip St John-Stevens, the court accepted his plea, dropped the indecent image charge – and sentence will be delivered on 7 September.

Single payments for regional advertising of profile (one-time appearance in scrolling banner for $1 – user picture, link, short text for mouseover; bidding war for stationary second banner cost of $1/minute).

||

Indeed, as previously reported in The Register, a submission by Kent Police to the consultation on the extreme porn law in 2005/6 complained that the law was insufficient and, as they submitted: "There remains a legislative gap in terms of written fantasy material specifically about child rape and murder".

This is legal dynamite - and in one single judgment catapults the UK to the back of the queue on a range of international indices on freedom of speech.

The change to the law - or clarification as judges might describe it - came about in February when the Appeal Court ruled on a prosecution appeal in respect of an individual identified only as "GS".

In the light of this ruling, GS, who had previously been defending against all counts, changed his plea to guilty.

– user picture, link, short text for mouseover; bidding war for stationary second banner cost of

Indeed, as previously reported in The Register, a submission by Kent Police to the consultation on the extreme porn law in 2005/6 complained that the law was insufficient and, as they submitted: "There remains a legislative gap in terms of written fantasy material specifically about child rape and murder".This is legal dynamite - and in one single judgment catapults the UK to the back of the queue on a range of international indices on freedom of speech.The change to the law - or clarification as judges might describe it - came about in February when the Appeal Court ruled on a prosecution appeal in respect of an individual identified only as "GS".In the light of this ruling, GS, who had previously been defending against all counts, changed his plea to guilty.Back at Maidstone Crown Court in July 2012, before Judge Philip St John-Stevens, the court accepted his plea, dropped the indecent image charge – and sentence will be delivered on 7 September.Single payments for regional advertising of profile (one-time appearance in scrolling banner for $1 – user picture, link, short text for mouseover; bidding war for stationary second banner cost of $1/minute).

||

Indeed, as previously reported in The Register, a submission by Kent Police to the consultation on the extreme porn law in 2005/6 complained that the law was insufficient and, as they submitted: "There remains a legislative gap in terms of written fantasy material specifically about child rape and murder".

This is legal dynamite - and in one single judgment catapults the UK to the back of the queue on a range of international indices on freedom of speech.

The change to the law - or clarification as judges might describe it - came about in February when the Appeal Court ruled on a prosecution appeal in respect of an individual identified only as "GS".

In the light of this ruling, GS, who had previously been defending against all counts, changed his plea to guilty.

Back at Maidstone Crown Court in July 2012, before Judge Philip St John-Stevens, the court accepted his plea, dropped the indecent image charge – and sentence will be delivered on 7 September.

Single payments for regional advertising of profile (one-time appearance in scrolling banner for $1 – user picture, link, short text for mouseover; bidding war for stationary second banner cost of $1/minute).

||

Indeed, as previously reported in The Register, a submission by Kent Police to the consultation on the extreme porn law in 2005/6 complained that the law was insufficient and, as they submitted: "There remains a legislative gap in terms of written fantasy material specifically about child rape and murder".

This is legal dynamite - and in one single judgment catapults the UK to the back of the queue on a range of international indices on freedom of speech.

The change to the law - or clarification as judges might describe it - came about in February when the Appeal Court ruled on a prosecution appeal in respect of an individual identified only as "GS".

In the light of this ruling, GS, who had previously been defending against all counts, changed his plea to guilty.

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