“The most moving [feedback] comes from people who are trans or nonbinary people feeling really included in this experience,” Gray says.

The heartaches and emotional wounds of the men you pursue are not obstacles to be overcome en route to sex, but rather fragments of real humanity that make them even more lovable—and often force you to reexamine your own intentions.

During the resolution of one storyline, you're given an option when comforting one of the dads in a moment of personal crisis: You can tell him what he wants to hear or tell him what he Some of the dads have had relationships with women, some with men, but there's no agonizing about their sexual orientation and no more mention of it than there would be in a traditionally heterosexual romance.

“You’re not going to be sleeping on a mattress surrounded by empty bottles of Mountain Dew. A daddy who has their life together enough to take care of another person is probably more emotionally mature than a twentysomething dude might be.”If ’s hit status suggests any one thing, though, it's that entrenched ideas about what kind of games can be successful and who wants to play them have less to do with reality and more to do with the self-fulfilling prophecy that the industry has become.

“The argument ‘oh, I don’t know if it’s going to sell’ isn’t going to fly anymore," Gray says.

They simply follow their hearts, and any obstacles they face are a result of emotional and personal complications, not struggles with their identities.

“We were determined to not make any of the dads' individual paths their sexuality or have their sexuality be their defining trait," Gray says."We can have narratives that are about queer people that are not necessarily about being queer.It’s about these relationships.”When you create your own character, you also have the option to make him a trans dad if you wish, complete with the ability to choose chest binders.But Gray sees something very different in the passionate response from fans: an audience that has gone dismally underserved by an industry that has failed to either see it or acknowledge it, and one that is ready to show up in force when offered a full-course meal rather than just scraps.She points to game franchises like , both of which have amassed huge followings in part because of the in-depth (and gender-inclusive) romances they offer in between their battles.“I know so many people who play those games not because they’re interested in the combat but because they want the romance and the relationships,” she says.