Members of the church were later called "Latter Day Saints", or "Mormons", and in 1838, Smith announced a revelation that renamed the church as the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

In 1831, Smith and his followers moved west, planning to build a communalistic American Zion.

His teachings include unique views about the nature of God, cosmology, family structures, political organization, and religious collectivism.

His followers regard him as a prophet comparable to Moses and Elijah, and several religious denominations consider themselves the continuation of the church he organized, including The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and the Community of Christ.

Later that year, when Smith promised to abandon treasure seeking, Hale offered to let the couple live on his property in Harmony and help Smith get started in business.

This time, he said he successfully retrieved the plates.

(December 23, 1805 – June 27, 1844) was an American religious leader and founder of Mormonism and the Latter Day Saint movement.

When he was twenty-four, Smith published the Book of Mormon.He said the angel commanded him not to show the plates to anyone else, but to translate them and publish their translation.Smith said the translation was a religious record of indigenous Americans.By the time of his death fourteen years later, he had attracted tens of thousands of followers and founded a religious culture that continues to the present. By 1817, he had moved with his family to what became known as the burned-over district of western New York, an area of intense religious revivalism during the Second Great Awakening.According to Smith, he experienced a series of visions, including one in which he saw "two personages" (presumably God the Father and Jesus Christ) and others in which an angel directed him to a buried book of golden plates inscribed with a Judeo-Christian history of an ancient American civilization.In February 1828, Martin Harris arrived to assist Smith by transcribing his dictation.