Think: Have you ever called yourself (or someone else) a slut when your true feelings weren’t ones of disgust or disapproval? For some young women, the stigma of “slut” is so hurtful that it leaves their lives in ruins.Take Rehtaeh Parsons of Canada, who was allegedly raped by four boys who distributed photos of the attack online. Boys she didn’t know started texting her and Facebooking her, asking her to have sex with them. People texted her all the time, saying ‘Will you have sex with me?

While the blame for the crime rests on the shoulders of the alleged rapists, it is possible that if Rehtaeh hadn’t been labeled a “slut” and endured the cruel bullying that she did, she might be alive today.

Tragically, this type of cyber-slut-shaming is not uncommon among the younger generations.

” Maybe learning more about the word itself – – is a good start.

Many of us have been called a slut at some point in our lives — or have thrown the epithet at someone else. The word “slut” originates in Old English, meaning a “messy, dirty, or untidy” woman or girl.

Imagine how it would feel to be that teenage girl who everyone is whispering about in the halls.

To have hurtful names like “slut,” “whore,” and “skank” assigned to you by people who barely know you.And using them just validates the societal standard of a perfect, virginal-until-marriage, demure woman as an ideal.I’ve often asked myself “What can we do about this nasty, negative word choice that is so standard in our culture? Or would you use a more negative term like “slutty?No doubt, it still carries weight if said with malicious intent.We condemn our sexual thoughts as slutty instead of explorative.