The present-day Capitoline Wolf could not have been the sculpture seen by Benedict and Gregorius, if its newly attributed age is accepted, though it is conceivable that it could have been a replacement for an earlier (now lost) depiction of the Roman wolf.

Suckling dating-12

In addition, La Regina, who is the state superintendent of Rome's cultural heritage, argues that the sculpture's artistic style is more akin to Carolingian and Romanesque art than that of the ancient world.

Radiocarbon and thermoluminescence dating was carried out at the University of Salento in February 2007 to resolve the question.

The Capitoline Wolf (Italian: Lupa Capitolina) is a bronze sculpture of the mythical she-wolf suckling the twins, Romulus and Remus, from the legend of the founding of Rome.

When Numitor, grandfather of the twins, was overthrown by his brother Amulius, the usurper ordered them to be cast into the Tiber River.

Winckelmann correctly identified a Renaissance origin for the twins; they were probably added in 1471 or later.

During the 19th century, a number of researchers questioned Winckelmann's dating of the bronze.

The Capitoline Wolf joined a number of other genuinely ancient sculptures transferred at the same time, to form the nucleus of the Capitoline Museum. According to a legend Siena was founded by Senius and Aschius, two sons of Remus.

When they fled Rome, they took the statue of the She-wolf to Siena, which became the symbol of the town.

They were rescued by a she-wolf who cared for them until a herdsman, Faustulus, found and raised them.