A New York Times reporter not only gave money to a child pornographer, but did business with him and even signed on to an illegal porn website as a member and administrator, documents unsealed yesterday in a federal criminal proceeding in Nashville reveal.He claims in one court document, he only “posed” as a pedophile.

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By then, Berry was an adult recruiting minors to perform sexually on webcams.

After discovering this, Eichenwald found Berry a lawyer, who took him to the Department of Justice and got him immunity from prosecution in exchange for turning state’s evidence against four mostly gay and young men.

One of the gray areas that's getting greater attention in the age of social media is what constitutes "possession" of child pornography.

Most social media sites can now store large caches of images indefinitely on the Internet, lessening the need for viewers to download files to their computers.

All were eventually charged and convicted of making and distributing porn depicting underage teen boys.

After Eichenwald wrote a blockbuster story about Berry for the Times, his journalism techniques aroused controversy in press circles.

Testifying there, Eichenwald said he was not acting as a reporter when he gave Berry the money, but was trying to save him from sexual exploitation and later demanded the money back before he started doing a Times piece.

This summer, a court hearing in the Nashville case revealed that Eichenwald gave yet more money to Berry, again without telling his editors.

Although it was used prior, the term "selfie" quickly became part of the mainstream lexicon in 2013 when its use became so common that it was named the "Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year." For the uninitiated, a selfie is a self-portrait photograph that's often taken with a camera phone, webcam, or digital camera.