For information about how to troubleshoot wireless connectivity on wireless networks that do not use 802.1X authentication, see Troubleshooting Microsoft Windows XP-based Wireless Networks in the Small Office or Home Office.

Troubleshooting Tools in Windows Wireless AP Troubleshooting Tools IAS Troubleshooting Tools Troubleshooting IAS Authentication and Authorization Summary Related Links The tools for troubleshooting wireless connections in Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 are the Network Connections folder and tracing.

For general troubleshooting of Windows XP wireless client issues, see Microsoft Knowledgebase article Q313242, "How to Troubleshoot Wireless Network Connections in Windows XP.” For Windows Server 2003-based wireless clients, you can use the new Wireless Monitor snap-in, which can be used to view wireless APs and wireless client event information.

Within the Network Connections folder, the text under the name of the connection corresponding to the wireless network adapter indicates the status of the connection.

Figure 1 shows the information available for a wireless connection in the Windows XP Network Connections folder.

To obtain detailed information about the Wireless Zero Configuration service for Windows XP SP2 or Windows Server 2003 with Service Pack 1 and the EAP authentication process for all versions of Windows XP or Windows Server 2003, you must enable tracing by typing netsh ras set tracing * enabled at a command prompt.

To obtain detailed information about how the Wireless Zero Configuration service connected to a wireless network for computers running Windows XP with SP2 or Windows Server 2003 with Service Pack 1, try the wireless connection again and view the and files in the \Tracing folder.

This article assumes background knowledge in IEEE 802.11 wireless LAN and associated security technologies and the components of a Windows-based authentication infrastructure.

For background information, see Wireless LAN Technologies and Microsoft Windows.

For detailed information about the contents of the file, see A Support Guide for Wireless Diagnostics and Troubleshooting.

For Windows 2000, you can enable tracing in the same way to view the files in the \Tracing folder.

If the wireless adapter has an Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA) address (169.254.0.0/16) or the configured alternate IP address, then authentication has failed and the Windows-based wireless client is still associated with the wireless AP.